Accessibility & Accommodation

In this episode of The Proskauer Brief, partners Harris Mufson and Guy Brenner discuss the coronavirus and what employers should be thinking about regarding that virus in the workplace. While the Occupational Safety and Health Administration has stated that most American workers are not at significant risk of infection at this time, it’s never too early for employers to consider how they can address employees’ concerns and help prevent an outbreak and address one if it occurs.  Tune in as we discuss practical tips and advice for employers who are thinking about being proactive in terms of confronting the potential issues associated with the coronavirus.

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Proskauer’s cross-disciplinary, cross-jurisdictional Coronavirus Response Team is focused on supporting and addressing client concerns. Visit our Coronavirus Resource Center for guidance on risk management measures, practical steps businesses can take and resources to help manage ongoing operations.

*** Last Updated: March 13, 2020 ***

News that cases of the newly-identified 2019 Novel Coronavirus (also referred to as COVID-19, 2019-nCoV, or SARS-CoV-2, but more commonly known simply as the “Coronavirus”) continue to spread has prompted employers to think about employee safety and ways to address prevention in the workplace, as well as planning

Effective January 11, 2020, the New York City Human Rights Law (“NYCHRL”) has been amended to expand protections under the law to freelancers and independent contractors.  Significantly, this includes the requirement that certain contractors now complete annual sexual harassment prevention training in the same manner as covered employees.  Contractors also are now eligible for reasonable

Heeding the adage “no one knows what the future may hold,” the Seventh, Eighth and Eleventh Circuits have uniformly refused to extend protections of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) to employees with a perceived risk of a potential impairment.

In each case, an employer either declined to hire an applicant or terminated an employee

UPDATE: The new laws have been enacted and will take effect on March 17, 2019.

The New York City Council recently passed two bills that would amend the NYC Human Rights Law to expand the requirements of employers with four or more employees to provide lactation space for breastfeeding employees.  The bills have been sent

New York City’s new law requiring employers to engage in a “cooperative dialogue” with employees requesting reasonable accommodation and provide a written determination at the end of the cooperative dialogue process takes effect on October 15, 2018.

As we have previously reported, while the New York City Human Rights Law (NYCHRL) has long