Discrimination, Harassment and Retaliation

On May 14, 2024 the New Jersey Office of the Attorney General and the Division on Civil Rights (DCR) published guidance on Discrimination and Out-of-State Remote Workers. This guidance, which is not legally binding, aims to clarify the DCR’s position on how the New Jersey Law Against Discrimination (LAD) applies to all workers who are

On May 7, 2024, the New Jersey Supreme Court held in Savage v. Township of Neptune that a non-disparagement clause in a settlement agreement between a former police sergeant and her former employer resolving sex discrimination, harassment and retaliation claims was against public policy and unenforceable under the New Jersey Law Against Discrimination (“LAD”). 

As

On April 29, 2024 the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) published its final guidance on harassment in the workplace.

As Proskauer previously covered, this final guidance follows proposed guidance, which the EEOC published on October 2, 2023. According to a press release issued by the EEOC, the final guidance “updates, consolidates, and replaces

On April 19, 2024, the EEOC published its final rule regarding the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act (“PWFA”). The PWFA requires covered employers to provide reasonable accommodations to qualified employees or candidates with a known limitation related to pregnancy, childbirth or related medical conditions absent undue hardship.

The final rule effectively tracks the proposed rule, which

On April 17, 2024, the United States Supreme Court ruled on the standard under which a plaintiff can proceed with a claim for a discriminatory job transfer under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (“Title VII”), holding that a plaintiff need only show that the transfer brought about “some” harm with respect

In King v. Aramark Services, Inc., No. 22-1237 (March 20, 2024), a Second Circuit panel affirmed the dismissal of claims under the New York State Human Rights Law (“NYSHRL”), concluding that under New York’s “impact test,” occasional remote work by an employee within the state is insufficient to render New York “the place