Law and the Workplace
Photo of Allan Bloom

Allan Bloom

Allan S. Bloom is a nationally recognized trial lawyer and advisor who represents management in a broad range of employment and labor law matters. As a litigator, Allan has successfully defended a number of the world’s leading companies against claims for unpaid wages, employment discrimination, breach of contract and wrongful discharge, both at the trial and appellate court levels as well as in arbitration. He has secured complete defense verdicts for clients in front of juries, as well as injunctions to protect clients’ confidential information and assets.

As the leader of Proskauer’s Wage and Hour Practice Group, Allan has been a strategic partner to a number of Fortune 500 companies to help them avoid, minimize and manage exposure to wage and hour-related risk. Allan’s views on wage and hour issues have been featured in The New York TimesReutersBloomberg and Fortune, among other leading publications. His class-action defense work for clients has saved hundreds of millions of dollars in potential damages.

Allan is regularly called on to advise boards of directors and senior leadership on highly sensitive matters such as executive transitions, internal investigations and strategic workforce planning. He also has particular expertise in the financial services industry, where he has litigated and arbitrated cases, including at FINRA and its predecessors, for more than 20 years.

Subscribe to all posts by Allan Bloom

New York State DOL Increases Upstate New York Minimum Wage, Proposes Hike in Upstate Minimum Salary for Exemption

As part of its goal of phasing in a $15 minimum wage for all employees in New York, the State began implementing annual increases in 2016 across all regions.  The annual increases are published by the Commissioner of Labor on or about October 1 of each year, and are based on percentage increases determined by … Continue Reading

Looking Ahead to 2023: Pay Transparency Developments

As we previously reported, as of November 1, 2022, New York City’s salary transparency law requires covered employers who advertise or post a job, promotion, or transfer opportunity for a role that can or will be performed, at least in part, in NYC to disclose in such advertisement of posting the minimum and maximum annual … Continue Reading

Regular Rate Update: California

Earlier this month, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit examined whether certain types of employee compensation—shift differentials and holiday premiums—are includable in the “regular rate” for purposes of calculating overtime pay under California law.  You can read our blog about the decision in our California Employment Law Update here. For a crash … Continue Reading

Westchester County, NY Pay Transparency Law Takes Effect

Effective November 6, 2022, the Westchester County (NY) Human Rights Law is amended to require that employers with at least four employees that are posting job, transfer or promotion opportunities which “are required to be performed, in whole or in part, in Westchester County, whether from an office, in the field, or remotely”** state the … Continue Reading

[Podcast]: The New York City Pay Transparency Law Takes Effect

In this episode of The Proskauer Brief, partners Evandro Gigante, Allan Bloom and special employment law counsel Laura Fant discuss the New York City Pay Transparency Law, which is set to come into effect on November 1, 2022. The law covers employers with four or more employees and generally requires covered employers who post a job, promotion, … Continue Reading

DOL’s New Independent Contractor Rule: A Return to 2020

It’s been a bumpy road for the federal rules on independent contractor status under the Fair Labor Standards Act. In the courts, the test has always focused on the “economic reality” of the relationship between a worker and the entity that benefits from the services provided to determine whether the worker is an employee or … Continue Reading

What to Do When Your Timekeeping System Crashes

A number of companies suffered collateral damage last winter as a result of a cyber attack on a major provider of time and attendance software.  With your timekeeping systems compromised, how do you determine what to pay your non-exempt employees, particularly with a payroll processing deadline looming? The Governing Principles To properly pay overtime-eligible employees, … Continue Reading

UPDATE: New York City’s Pay Transparency Law Is Here – Are You Ready?

New York City’s pay transparency law, which requires most New York City employers to disclose salary ranges in their job postings, took effect on November 1, 2022. As we previously reported, the new law amends the New York City Human Rights Law to require covered employers who post a job, promotion, or transfer opportunity for … Continue Reading

Federal District Court Says Pre-Shift COVID Screening Time Not Compensable

In the first reported decision we’ve seen addressing the issue head on, a federal district court in California dismissed a putative collective action claim under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) seeking payment for time spent in pre-shift COVID screening. Prior to clocking in each day, the plaintiff—a non-exempt truck driver whose job duties included … Continue Reading

New York State Legislature Approves Statutory Protections for Independent Contractors

In 2016, New York City enacted the Freelance Isn’t Free Act, a local law establishing protections for certain freelance workers providing services for entities located in the City. Earlier this month, the New York State Legislature approved a bill providing similar protections to freelance workers throughout the state. The New York State Freelance Isn’t Free … Continue Reading

UPDATED: New York State Enacts Law Requiring Wage Ranges in Job Postings

***UPDATE: Governor Kathy Hochul signed the bill into law on December 21, 2022.  The law takes effect on September 17, 2023.*** The New York State Legislature has passed Senate Bill S9427, which will require employers with four or more employees to include in job postings – including those for promotion or transfer opportunities – the … Continue Reading

UPDATED: NYC Council Approves Salary Disclosure Law Amendment to Delay Effective Date

***UPDATE: Mayor Adams signed the bill into law on May 12, 2022.  It takes effect immediately.*** The NYC Council has approved a bill to amend the pending New York City pay transparency law that will require employers to disclose salary ranges in job postings.  The bill amends several aspects of the law, including, notably, extending … Continue Reading

NYC Commission on Human Rights Issues Guidance on Salary Disclosure Law

The New York City Commission on Human Rights (NYCCHR) has released a fact sheet providing some additional details and guidance regarding the upcoming salary disclosure law. As we previously reported, the new law will make it an unlawful discriminatory practice under the New York City Human Rights Law (NYCHRL) for a covered employer or its … Continue Reading

Bill Introduced to Amend (and Delay Effective Date of) NYC Salary Disclosure Law

***UPDATE: A revised version of this bill has been approved by the NYC Council.  Read more here.*** A bill has been introduced before the NYC Council that would amend the recently enacted law requiring employers to include salary ranges in job postings. As we previously reported, the new law will make it an unlawful discriminatory … Continue Reading

U.S. House Passes Bill that Places Future of Arbitration Agreements at Risk

It’s only been two weeks since President Biden signed the Ending Forced Arbitration of Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment Act of 2021 (the “Ending Forced Arbitration Act”) into law (which we covered here), and there is already a new major development in the world of arbitration. Yesterday, the U.S. House passed the Forced Arbitration Injustice … Continue Reading

Sweeping Expansion of Protections Relating to Workplace Discrimination on the Horizon in New York State

A suite of bills aimed at further enhancing protections for both employees and independent contractors regarding discrimination, harassment and retaliation in the workplace are on the horizon in New York State.  Several of these bills, if ultimately enacted, would potentially lead to a groundbreaking shift in how employers approach settlement of discrimination, harassment and retaliation … Continue Reading

Do We Have to Pay for That?  Part 2—Travel and Commute Time (in a Post-Pandemic World)

In this blog series, we look at a variety of activities and discuss whether an employer has to pay its non-exempt (i.e., overtime-eligible) employees for their time spent engaging in them.  We’ll focus on federal law, but as with all wage and hour issues, applicable state and local laws must be considered as well.  Also, … Continue Reading

New York Department of Labor Issues Required Posting for Expanded Whistleblower Protection Law

The New York State Department of Labor (NYSDOL) has issued a form of required notice regarding the dramatically expanded whistleblower protections under New York Labor Law § 740 that took effect last month. As we previously reported, the expanded law – which took effect on January 26, 2022 – significantly bolsters protections for private-sector workers … Continue Reading

New Federal Vaccine Rule:  Wage and Hour Implications

UPDATE: On January 13, 2022, the U.S. Supreme Court granted applications to stay OSHA’s Emergency Temporary Standard pending review on the merits by the Sixth Circuit, and if writs of certiorari are subsequently sought to the U.S. Supreme Court, pending the Court’s disposition of such writs.  Click here to read more about the Court’s decision.  On … Continue Reading

Do We Have to Pay for That?  Part 1—COVID-19 Vaccination, Testing, and Screening Activities (Updated Jan. 13, 2022)

In this blog series, we’ll look at a variety of activities and discuss whether an employer has to pay its non-exempt (i.e., overtime-eligible) employees for their time spent engaging in them.  We’ll focus on federal law, but as with all wage and hour issues, applicable state and local laws must be considered as well.  Also, … Continue Reading
LexBlog

This website uses third party cookies, over which we have no control. To deactivate the use of third party advertising cookies, you should alter the settings in your browser.

OK