Accessibility & Accommodation

On August 11, 2023, the EEOC issued a proposed rule regarding the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act (“PWFA”). The PWFA, which took effect on June 27, 2023 requires covered employers to provide reasonable accommodations to qualified employees or candidates with a known limitation related to pregnancy, childbirth or related medical conditions absent undue hardship.

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As we covered here, the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act (PWFA) is effective today! As a reminder, the PWFA extends the requirements of the ADA to employees with known limitations related to, affected by, or arising out of pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions. The EEOC stated that they will begin accepting charges of discrimination

On May 11, 2023, Governor Ron DeSantis signed into law a “medical freedom” bill (SB 252), which amends and expands the existing Florida statute Section 381.00316, prohibiting businesses from requiring their customers and patrons to provide documentation of COVID-19 vaccination status. Under the amended law, businesses in Florida will be prohibited from discriminating

In our recent blog post, we highlighted legislation that will impact employers this year related to nursing and pregnant employees: the Providing Urgent Maternal Protections for Nursing Mothers Act (the “PUMP Act”) and the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act (the “PWFA”).  As this legislation becomes effective—with the PUMP Act taking effect on April 28, 2023

On July 12, 2022, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) – the agency which investigates and enforces federal antidiscrimination laws in the workplace – updated its guidance across several different areas relating to COVID-19 and the workplace, including when employees can be required to undergo COVID-19 testing, reasonable accommodations, and parameters around mandatory vaccination programs.

On March 14, 2022, the EEOC released new guidance regarding caregiver discrimination and the COVID-19 pandemic, in light of many workplaces returning to in-person work. The new guidance supplements earlier guidance regarding the treatment of workers with caregiving responsibilities.

The new guidance reiterates that while the status of being a caregiver is not a protected