Law and the Workplace

Tag Archives: overtime

New York State Issues Updated Minimum Wage Poster

The New York State Department of Labor has issued the updated minimum wage poster for “Miscellaneous Industry” employees for 2024.  The update covers all industries other than hospitality, farmworkers, and building service.  The poster outlines the regional minimum hourly rates based on an employee’s work location.  NY employers are required to display the poster in … Continue Reading

New York Finalizes Increases in Minimum Wage, Minimum Salaries for Exemption in 2024

On December 27, 2023, the New York State Department of Labor published a Notice of Adoption in the New York State Register, finalizing increases in the minimum wage and minimum salaries for exemption effective January 1, 2024. The minimum wage for employees in New York City, Nassau, Suffolk, and Westchester counties increases to $16 per … Continue Reading

Proposed New Federal Overtime Rule: Update

The Notice of Proposed Rulemaking with respect to the U.S. Department of Labor’s proposed updated overtime exemptions rule was published in the Federal Register on September 8, 2023.  The 60-day public comment period closes on November 7, 2023.  Comments can be submitted electronically here, and all submitted comments can be viewed here. Proskauer’s Wage and Hour Group is … Continue Reading

DOL Proposes Updated Overtime Exemptions Rule, Raising Minimum Salary to $55,086

On August 30, 2023, the U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) released its proposed new rule on the “white collar” overtime exemptions.  The new rule, which would be codified in a revised 29 C.F.R. Part 541, will be published shortly as a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking in the Federal Register, at which time a public comment … Continue Reading

SCOTUS:  Daily Rate Doesn’t Satisfy FLSA’s Salary Basis Test for Exemption, Even If It’s Huge!

It’s always exciting when the Supreme Court takes up a wage and hour issue—at least for us.  Earlier this week, in Helix Energy Solutions Group, Inc. v. Hewitt, the court tackled the question of whether a daily rate can satisfy the “salary basis” test for exemption under the Fair Labor Standards Act as an executive, … Continue Reading

New York State DOL Increases Upstate New York Minimum Wage, Proposes Hike in Upstate Minimum Salary for Exemption

As part of its goal of phasing in a $15 minimum wage for all employees in New York, the State began implementing annual increases in 2016 across all regions.  The annual increases are published by the Commissioner of Labor on or about October 1 of each year, and are based on percentage increases determined by … Continue Reading

Regular Rate Update: California

Earlier this month, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit examined whether certain types of employee compensation—shift differentials and holiday premiums—are includable in the “regular rate” for purposes of calculating overtime pay under California law.  You can read our blog about the decision in our California Employment Law Update here. For a crash … Continue Reading

What to Do When Your Timekeeping System Crashes

A number of companies suffered collateral damage last winter as a result of a cyber attack on a major provider of time and attendance software.  With your timekeeping systems compromised, how do you determine what to pay your non-exempt employees, particularly with a payroll processing deadline looming? The Governing Principles To properly pay overtime-eligible employees, … Continue Reading

Do We Have to Pay for That?  Part 2—Travel and Commute Time (in a Post-Pandemic World)

In this blog series, we look at a variety of activities and discuss whether an employer has to pay its non-exempt (i.e., overtime-eligible) employees for their time spent engaging in them.  We’ll focus on federal law, but as with all wage and hour issues, applicable state and local laws must be considered as well.  Also, … Continue Reading

Do We Have to Pay for That?  Part 1—COVID-19 Vaccination, Testing, and Screening Activities (Updated Jan. 13, 2022)

In this blog series, we’ll look at a variety of activities and discuss whether an employer has to pay its non-exempt (i.e., overtime-eligible) employees for their time spent engaging in them.  We’ll focus on federal law, but as with all wage and hour issues, applicable state and local laws must be considered as well.  Also, … Continue Reading

Pennsylvania Employers Must Pay for Time Spent in Security Screenings

On July 21, 2021, answering a question certified by the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court held that time spent by employees waiting to undergo and undergoing mandatory security screening on an employer’s premises is compensable “hours worked” under Pennsylvania law.  The decision from the Commonwealth’s high court, … Continue Reading

DOL and Liquidated Damages: The Breakup Only Lasted 9 Months

On April 9, 2021, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) rescinded the Trump-era enforcement practice of abstaining from seeking liquidated damages in connection with pre-litigation investigations and settlements of wage and hour claims.  In Field Assistance Bulletin No. 2021-2, issued by the Wage and Hour Division’s Principal Deputy Administrator, Jessica Looman, the agency announced that … Continue Reading

DOL Ends PAID Program

On January 29, the U.S. Department of Labor announced that it was discontinuing the Payroll Audit Independent Determination (“PAID”) program, effective immediately.  Under the program, which began in 2018, employers could self-report wage and hour violations to the DOL with the promise that the agency would supervise a settlement of the violations without seeking liquidated … Continue Reading

DOL Issues Opinion Letters on Administrative Exemption and Ministerial Exception

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division (WHD) issued two new opinion letters on January 8, 2021, bringing the number of “lame duck” wage and hour opinion letters—issued since Election Day 2020—to six. In FLSA2021-1, WHD determined that account managers at a life sciences manufacturer qualify for the FLSA’s administrative exemption.  The account … Continue Reading

Trump DOL Issues Two More “Lame Duck” Opinion Letters, on Home-to-Office Travel Time and Live-In Caregivers

On December 31, 2020, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division (WHD) issued two opinion letters—one on home-to-office travel time and one on live-in caregivers.  Such “lame duck” opinion letters—issued post-Election Day when there is a change in both administration and political party—were at one point in recent memory quite uncommon.  The Carter … Continue Reading

DOL’s New Opinion Letters Examine Rules on Voluntary Training Time, Travel Time

On November 3, 2020, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division (“WHD”) issued new opinion letters addressing the compensability of time spent by employees attending voluntary training programs and in work-related travel. The rules at issue only apply to non-exempt (e.g., overtime-eligible) employees.  If the time is considered “hours worked” under the FLSA, … Continue Reading

DOL Reiterates That Hours Need Not Fluctuate Above and Below 40 in Fluctuating Workweek Method of Pay

SchedulingIn an opinion letter issued on August 31, 2020, the U.S. Department of Labor restated its position that an employee’s hours need not fluctuate above and below 40 hours to qualify for the fluctuating workweek (“FWW”) method of calculating overtime pay in 29 C.F.R. § 778.114. Under the FWW method of pay, an overtime-eligible employee … Continue Reading

DOL Guidance Reminds Employers of Obligations to Track and Pay For Remote Work

On August 24, 2020, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division (“WHD”) issued a Field Assistance Bulletin (“FAB”) providing guidance on employers’ obligations under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) to track and pay for the hours of compensable work performed by employees who are working remotely.  While timely in light of the … Continue Reading

DOL To Refrain From Seeking Liquidated Damages in Most Pre-Litigation Settlements

SchedulingEffective July 1, 2020, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) will pull back on seeking liquidated damages in pre-litigation settlements of wage claims and investigations.  The change in policy, announced in Field Assistance Bulletin 2020-2, is significant, as liquidated damages can equal 100% of the back pay deemed to be owing, potentially resulting in “double … Continue Reading
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