Law and the Workplace

Tag Archives: minimum wage

D.C. Mayor Approves Law Expanding Reach of D.C. Minimum Wage Law

On January 10, 2024, D.C. Mayor, Muriel Bowser, signed the “Minimum Wage Clarification Amendment Act of 2023” into law. If the Act is not overturned by Congress, it will expand the circumstances where employers must pay employees D.C.’s minimum wage (currently $17.00 an hour for non-tipped employees). Under existing law, employers are required to pay … Continue Reading

New York State Issues Updated Minimum Wage Poster

The New York State Department of Labor has issued the updated minimum wage poster for “Miscellaneous Industry” employees for 2024.  The update covers all industries other than hospitality, farmworkers, and building service.  The poster outlines the regional minimum hourly rates based on an employee’s work location.  NY employers are required to display the poster in … Continue Reading

New York Finalizes Increases in Minimum Wage, Minimum Salaries for Exemption in 2024

On December 27, 2023, the New York State Department of Labor published a Notice of Adoption in the New York State Register, finalizing increases in the minimum wage and minimum salaries for exemption effective January 1, 2024. The minimum wage for employees in New York City, Nassau, Suffolk, and Westchester counties increases to $16 per … Continue Reading

Missed Payroll in the Wake of Bank Collapse:  Implications and Strategies

In the wake of the recent news of bank failures, businesses—and their investors—are rightly concerned about the implications of a missed or delayed payroll.  Let’s look at those implications, and strategies for minimizing risk. Obligation to Make Payroll Under federal and most state laws, employers have both timing-of-pay and frequency-of-pay obligations.  Under most of these … Continue Reading

New York State DOL Increases Upstate New York Minimum Wage, Proposes Hike in Upstate Minimum Salary for Exemption

As part of its goal of phasing in a $15 minimum wage for all employees in New York, the State began implementing annual increases in 2016 across all regions.  The annual increases are published by the Commissioner of Labor on or about October 1 of each year, and are based on percentage increases determined by … Continue Reading

Do We Have to Pay for That?  Part 2—Travel and Commute Time (in a Post-Pandemic World)

In this blog series, we look at a variety of activities and discuss whether an employer has to pay its non-exempt (i.e., overtime-eligible) employees for their time spent engaging in them.  We’ll focus on federal law, but as with all wage and hour issues, applicable state and local laws must be considered as well.  Also, … Continue Reading

Massachusetts High Court Clarifies Test to Determine Joint Employer Status under State Wage and Overtime Statutes

On December 13, 2021, the highest state court in Massachusetts ruled that the proper test for determining joint employer status under the state’s wage and overtime statutes is the “totality of the circumstances” test formerly used under the Federal Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”), and not the more restrictive test of Mass. Gen. L. c. … Continue Reading

Chicago Expands Paid Sick Leave Ordinance

Effective August 1, 2021, the City of Chicago’s Minimum Wage and Paid Sick Leave Ordinance was amended to provide for additional uses of paid sick leave for eligible employees.  Under the Amended Ordinance, an employee who works at least 80 hours for an employer within any 120-day period while physically present within the geographic boundaries … Continue Reading

Pennsylvania Employers Must Pay for Time Spent in Security Screenings

On July 21, 2021, answering a question certified by the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court held that time spent by employees waiting to undergo and undergoing mandatory security screening on an employer’s premises is compensable “hours worked” under Pennsylvania law.  The decision from the Commonwealth’s high court, … Continue Reading

DOL and Liquidated Damages: The Breakup Only Lasted 9 Months

On April 9, 2021, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) rescinded the Trump-era enforcement practice of abstaining from seeking liquidated damages in connection with pre-litigation investigations and settlements of wage and hour claims.  In Field Assistance Bulletin No. 2021-2, issued by the Wage and Hour Division’s Principal Deputy Administrator, Jessica Looman, the agency announced that … Continue Reading

Biden Administration Wage and Hour Update:  50 Days In…

We’re 50 days into the Biden administration.  Here’s an update on where things stand with respect to wage and hour law at the federal level: On March 11, 2021, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division (WHD)—as expected—announced its proposals to rescind the Trump-era rules on independent contractor classification and joint employment. WHD’s … Continue Reading

DOL Ends PAID Program

On January 29, the U.S. Department of Labor announced that it was discontinuing the Payroll Audit Independent Determination (“PAID”) program, effective immediately.  Under the program, which began in 2018, employers could self-report wage and hour violations to the DOL with the promise that the agency would supervise a settlement of the violations without seeking liquidated … Continue Reading

DOL’s New Opinion Letters Examine Rules on Voluntary Training Time, Travel Time

On November 3, 2020, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division (“WHD”) issued new opinion letters addressing the compensability of time spent by employees attending voluntary training programs and in work-related travel. The rules at issue only apply to non-exempt (e.g., overtime-eligible) employees.  If the time is considered “hours worked” under the FLSA, … Continue Reading

DOL To Refrain From Seeking Liquidated Damages in Most Pre-Litigation Settlements

SchedulingEffective July 1, 2020, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) will pull back on seeking liquidated damages in pre-litigation settlements of wage claims and investigations.  The change in policy, announced in Field Assistance Bulletin 2020-2, is significant, as liquidated damages can equal 100% of the back pay deemed to be owing, potentially resulting in “double … Continue Reading

Fewer Than 100 Days Until the New Overtime Rule Takes Effect: Is Your Company Ready?

On January 1, 2020, the new federal overtime rule takes effect.  Other than in states with already-higher minimum salaries for exemption (which include California and, for certain types of employees, New York), employers will be required to pay most executive, administrative, and professional employees at least $684 per week ($35,568 per year).  Are you ready for … Continue Reading

The New Federal Overtime Rule:  What You Need to Know

The U.S. Department of Labor issued its final rule amending the overtime regulations today, without any significant changes from the proposed rule the agency issued in March 2019.  Here’s the bottom line: The salary minimum for exemption as an executive, administrative, or professional employee will jump from $455 per week ($23,660 per year) to $684 … Continue Reading

Nevada Enacts Laws Regarding Paid Personal Leave, Drug Testing, and Minimum Wage

Continuing the trend of states passing increasingly progressive employment regulations, Nevada recently enacted three new laws addressing paid leave, workplace drug testing, and minimum wage. Paid Personal Leave Following in the footsteps of Maine, which recently became the first state to enact a personal leave law, SB 312 will require private employers with 50 or … Continue Reading

DOL Validates Independent Contractor Relationships in the On-Demand Marketplace

In an opinion letter issued April 29, 2019, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division concluded that a “virtual marketplace company” (“VMC”) that connects service providers with consumers is not the employer of the service providers.  The opinion should be a welcome one not only for VMCs and businesses in the “gig economy,” … Continue Reading

Reminder: New York Minimum Salary for Exemption, Minimum Wage Increasing on December 31

As discussed in our earlier post, New York State’s annual increases for overtime exemption and minimum wage go into effect on December 31, 2018. Employers whose exempt “administrative” and “executive” employees are currently paid less than the new salary minimums must either increase those salaries to the new levels or start paying the affected employees … Continue Reading

New Federal Tip Rules Expected in October 2018

Since 1966, Section 3(m) of the Fair Labor Standards Act permits an employer to take a tip credit toward its minimum wage obligation for tipped employees equal to the difference between the required cash wage (currently $2.13) and the federal minimum wage (currently $7.25).  Employers using the tip credit must be able to show that … Continue Reading

New York Minimum Salary for Exemption, Minimum Wage to Increase on December 31

It’s that time of year again!  New York State’s annual threshold increases for overtime exemption and minimum wage go into effect on December 31, 2018.  On that date: The minimum salary for exemption as an “administrative” or “executive” employee increases from $975 per week ($50,700 annually) to $1,125 per week ($58,500 annually) for New York City … Continue Reading
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