Photo of E. Sydney Cone

Sydney Cone earned her J.D. from Tulane University Law School, where she was the Senior Online Editor of the Tulane Maritime Law Journal and co-president of Tulane Women in the Law.

Prior to law school, Sydney was a paralegal for Lankler, Siffert, and Wohl, LLP, focusing on white collar criminal and civil litigation.

On August 31, 2023, the Delaware Court of Chancery held, with respect to a non-compete provision in an employment agreement, that: (1) the choice of law provision selecting Delaware was “not necessarily binding”; and (2) the non-compete was unenforceable. Centurion Service Group, LLC v. Wilensky, No. 2023-0422-MTZ. This is that court’s second decision

Almost 2 years after the Ban on Non-Compete Agreements Amendment Act (“the Act”) was passed, the Act – with significant amendments – will become effective and applicable to all employers with D.C. employees on October 1, 2022. The law generally prohibits employers from entering into or imposing non-compete agreements and policies on D.C. employees that

Mayor Bowser signed the Amendment on July 27, 2022. The Amendment will go into effect on October 1, 2022 (absent action by Congress, which is not expected).

On July 12, 2022, the District of Columbia Council voted to modify key aspects of the Ban on Non-Compete Agreements Amendment Act (“the Act”), passing the Non-Compete Clarification

On June 8, 2022, Colorado Governor Jared Polis signed Colorado House Bill 22-1317 (the “Bill”), which was passed by the Colorado Legislature on May 10, 2022. Effective 90 days from the end of the legislative session – on August 10, 2022 – Colorado will join the ranks of Illinois, Washington, and other states

On March 31, 2022, a Kentucky jury unanimously awarded $450,000 to an employee, who was terminated following two panic attacks the employee suffered at work. The jury concluded the employee’s anxiety disorder was a disability and that the employee suffered an adverse action because of his disability.

Brief Background

In Berling v. Gravity Diagnostics, LLC

On March 11, 2022, the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit affirmed summary judgment, dismissing a Texas city employee’s claim that he had been unlawfully terminated from his job because of his age. The Fifth Circuit held that age discrimination comments must contain age-specific references, and a factfinder cannot infer age discrimination