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Rachel S. Fischer is a senior counsel in the Labor & Employment Law Department.

Rachel represents employers in all types of employment-related disputes, including defending clients against claims of discrimination, harassment, retaliation, wrongful discharge, whistleblowing, breach of contract, and in wage and hour matters. She represents employers in federal and state courts, arbitration tribunals, and before administrative agencies, and has litigated both single plaintiff and class action lawsuits. As an experienced trial lawyer, Rachel has successfully litigated numerous cases from complaint through jury verdict or arbitral award.

Rachel represents employers across a wide variety of industries, including banking and finance, law firms, media and entertainment, sports, and higher education.

Rachel also counsels clients on a broad range of employment law matters, including investigations, employee terminations and discipline, and employment policies and procedures.

On June 29, 2023, the U.S. Supreme Court held in Students for Fair Admissions, Inc. v. President and Fellows of Harvard College, No. 20-1199 (June 29, 2023), that the race-conscious admissions programs at one public and one private institution covered by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act violated the Equal Protection Clause

On January 19, 2021, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit issued a noteworthy decision in Lemon v. Myers Bigel, P.A., No. 19-1380, 2021 WL 161978 (4th Cir. 2021), affirming a decision by the Eastern District of North Carolina holding that a law firm equity partner was not an “employee,” and was

The subject of workplace violence has unfortunately made headlines once again after a news anchor and cameraman were killed by a former co-worker in Virginia last week. Employers are understandably concerned and have questions about what they can do to help prevent workplace violence.

The Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) requires employers to maintain

New York recently passed a new leave law mandating unpaid leave for emergency responders.  The law took effect December 22, 2014.  Under the law, employers must provide unpaid leave to employees who serve as volunteer firefighters or volunteer ambulance personnel when the governor declares a state of emergency, unless the employee’s absence would impose and

On June 20, 2014, the New York state legislature approved a bill that would allow patients to use marijuana for limited medical therapeutic purposes. Governor Cuomo is expected to sign the bill into law. The bill will not take effect until 18 months after it is signed into law, giving employers time to consider the