Photo of Dixie Morrison

Dixie Morrison is an associate in the Labor & Employment Department and a member of the Employment Litigation & Arbitration Group. She is a member of the Discrimination, Harassment, & Title VII and the Labor-Management Relations practice groups.

Dixie assists clients across a variety of industries in litigation and arbitration relating to wrongful termination, discrimination, harassment, retaliation, wage and hour, trade secrets, breach of contract, and whistleblower matters in both the single-plaintiff and class and collective action contexts. She also maintains an active traditional labor and collective bargaining practice and regularly counsels employers on a diverse range of workplace issues.

Dixie earned her J.D. from Harvard Law School, where she was the Executive Editor of Submissions for the Journal of Sports and Entertainment Law. Dixie received her B.A., magna cum laude, from Pomona College. Prior to law school, she served as a labor and economic policy aide in the United States Senate.

A federal court in New York has held that a Broadway musical’s casting decisions—specifically replacing one actor with another actor of a different race—are shielded by the First Amendment from employment discrimination claims, in a decision that could have implications across the entertainment industry.

In Moore v. Hadestown Broadway LLC, the plaintiff, a Black

On August 9, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) and iTutorGroup, Inc. filed a joint notice of settlement and consent decree announcing the settlement of a discrimination in hiring lawsuit. This settlement marks the first instance in which the EEOC settled a lawsuit alleging unlawful discrimination stemming from the use of Artificial Intelligence (“AI”)

A new federal law invalidating pre-dispute arbitration agreements for sexual harassment and sexual assault claims does not apply retroactively, a New Jersey appeals court recently confirmed.

In Zuluaga v. Altice USA (N.J. App. Div. Nov. 29, 2022), the plaintiff had signed an arbitration agreement waiving her right to bring employment-related disputes in court when

Employers are more frequently relying on the use of Artificial Intelligence (“AI”) tools to automate employment decision-making, such as software that can review resumes and “chatbots” that interview and screen job applicants. We have previously blogged about the legal risks attendant to the use of such technologies, including here and here.

On May 12,