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Hannah D. Morris is an associate in the Labor Department and a member of the Employment Litigation & Counseling Group.

During her time at Proskauer, Hannah has assisted in litigation and investigation matters involving workplace harassment, discrimination, and retaliation. She also assists employers in counseling matters, such as drafting employment handbooks and researching workplace policies.

Hannah earned her J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law. While in law school, she served as a Research Assistant for Professor Richard J. Bonnie working on matters related to juvenile justice. Additionally, she interned for the Office of the Public Defender for Arlington County and the City of Falls Church.

Prior to law school, Hannah was a Teach for America Corps member teaching Fourth Grade in Eastern North Carolina.

The New York State Department of Labor (“DOL”) has released its long-awaited updated model sexual harassment prevention policy that addresses issues such as gender identity, remote work, and bystander intervention. As we previously reported, the DOL published proposed changes to the model policy in January of this year, and the updated policy largely mirrors

A trio of New York State Senators has proposed a bill that would create a cause of action for “wrongful discharge.”  If enacted, the “Safeguarding Employees and Accountability for Termination (SEAT) Act” would be codified in a new Article 20-D of the Labor Law and take effect 90 days after being signed into law.  The

As we have previously reported (here, here and here), there are novel risks associated with employer use of AI tools in the workplace. While such tools have caught the attention of the EEOC and state and local legislatures, we have yet to see a proliferation of litigation in this area. However, that

As previously reported, employers’ use of artificial intelligence to assist in employment decision-making is being subjected to ever-increasing regulatory scrutiny at all levels of government―local, state, and federal. In the New Jersey General Assembly, A4909 (“A4909”) was introduced on December 5, 2022, proposing a host of legal requirements that would apply to automated employment

A proposed ordinance has been introduced before the New York City Council to significantly expand the existing NYC pay transparency law.

As we have previously reported, the current law requires most New York City employers to disclose the minimum and maximum salary or hourly wage for open roles in postings for job, promotions or

On January 12, 2023 the New York State Department of Labor (“DOL”) issued an updated Proposed Sexual Harassment Prevention Model Policy which, among other things, addresses remote work, gender identity and bystander intervention methods.  The public has 30 days (until February 11) to comment on the proposed revisions prior to a final version being adopted.