Law and the Workplace
Laura Fant

Laura Fant

Associate

Laura Fant is an associate in the Labor & Employment Law Department.

She frequently counsels on matters involving the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Family and Medical Leave Act, including disability accommodation in the workplace and public accommodations. She is experienced in conducting accessibility audits and providing ADA and accessibility training for clients in a variety of sectors that include retail, hospitality, sports and not-for-profit. She also handles general employment counseling and has experience in reviewing and updating employee handbooks and company policies under federal and state law.

Subscribe to all posts by Laura Fant

Final Regulations for New York State Paid Family Leave Law Adopted

The New York Workers Compensation Board (the “Board”) has adopted final regulations for implementation of the New York Paid Family Leave Law (“PFLL”).  The final regulations are effectively immediately. Long awaited by New York employers, the final regulations make several changes to the prior proposed regulations, which were issued by the Board in May and … Continue Reading

Connecticut Expands Anti-Discrimination and Accommodation Protections for Pregnant Employees and Applicants

Earlier this month, Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy has signed into law “An Act Concerning Pregnant Women in the Workplace” (the “Act”), which enhances employment protections for pregnant employees and applicants under the state’s existing anti-discrimination law. The expanded protections amend the Connecticut Fair Employment Practices Act (“CFEPA”) and will go into effect October 1, 2017. … Continue Reading

New Rules Implementing the NYC Freelance Isn’t Free Act To Become Effective on July 24, 2017

As we previously reported, in November 2016, NYC Mayor De Blasio signed into law the Freelance Isn’t Free Act, establishing protections for freelance workers, including the right to receive a written contract for work valued at $800 or more, the right to be paid timely and in full, and the right to be free from … Continue Reading

New York Paid Family Leave Final Regulations Still Awaited As Proposed July 1 Date to Begin Deductions Arrives

As we have previously reported, on May 24, 2017, the New York Workers Compensation Board issued revisions to its proposed rules for implementation of the New York Paid Family Leave Law (“PFLL”).  While the public comment period for the proposed revisions closed on June 23, we are still awaiting publication of the final regulations. The … Continue Reading

UPDATE: Philadelphia Law Prohibiting Salary History Inquiries Survives Legal Challenge … For Now

A Pennsylvania federal district court has dismissed a lawsuit seeking to declare unconstitutional a Philadelphia ordinance making it unlawful for employers to inquire into a job applicant’s wage history during the hiring process. As we previously reported, the Chamber of Commerce for Greater Philadelphia (the “Chamber”) sought to enjoin the new city law in April 2017, … Continue Reading

NYC Mayor Signs Into Law Suite of Retail and Fast Food Employee Protections

On May 30, 2017, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio signed a bill package into law that will impose new restrictions on retail and fast food employers with regard to employee scheduling, hiring, and pay practices. The laws take effect on November 26, 2017. The “Fair Workweek” bills address issues including more predictable working schedules, … Continue Reading

Maximum Employee Contribution Rate Announced for New York State Paid Family Leave Law

As we recently reported, the New York Workers Compensation Board has issued revisions to its proposed rules for implementation of the New York Paid Family Leave Law (“PFLL”). Subsequently, on June 1, 2017, the New York State Department of Financial Services (“DFS”) issued a statement setting forth the maximum employee contribution rate for PFLL coverage … Continue Reading

Revisions to Proposed Regulations for New York State Paid Family Leave Law Issued

The New York Workers Compensation Board has issued revisions to its proposed rules for implementation of the New York Paid Family Leave Law (“PFLL”). As we previously reported, the Board issued initial proposed rules for implementation of the PFLL in February 2017.  The current revisions, which were issued on May 24, 2017 following the Board’s … Continue Reading

New York Court of Appeals Clarifies Application of New York’s Criminal History Discrimination and “Aiding and Abetting” Provisions

In Griffin v. Sirva, Inc., the New York Court of Appeals held that while only “employers” may be liable for criminal conviction history discrimination under Section 296(15) of the New York State Human Rights Law (“NYSHRL”), a covered employer may extend beyond a worker’s direct employer to also include entities that exercise “order and control” … Continue Reading

Mayor Signs Into Law New York City Bill Restricting Employer Inquiries Into Applicants’ Salary History

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has signed into law a bill that will make it unlawful for employers to inquire into or rely upon job applicants’ wage history during the hiring process, with limited exception.  The law will take effect on October 31, 2017. As we previously reported, the law prohibits employers, employment … Continue Reading

Philadelphia Delays Implementation of Ordinance Restricting Employer Inquiries Into Applicants’ Salary History Following Legal Challenge

Philadelphia has indefinitely delayed implementation of its new ordinance that that will make it unlawful for employers to inquire into an applicant’s wage history during the hiring process. As we previously reported, the law was scheduled to take effect on May 23, 2017.  However, on April 6, 2017, the Chamber of Commerce for Greater Philadelphia … Continue Reading

New York City Council Approves Bill Restricting Employer Inquiries Into Applicants’ Salary History

The New York City Council has approved a bill that would make it unlawful for employers to inquire into or rely upon job applicants’ wage history during the hiring process, with limited exception.  The bill now goes before Mayor Bill de Blasio and, if signed, will become effective 180 days following signature. As we previously … Continue Reading

Seventh Circuit Becomes First Federal Court of Appeals to Hold That Sexual Orientation Discrimination Is Prohibited Under Title VII

In an 8-3 en banc decision in Hively v. Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana, the Seventh Circuit has held that discrimination based on sexual orientation is a form of sex discrimination under Title VII.  In so holding, the Seventh Circuit has become the first federal appellate court to extend the protections of Title VII … Continue Reading

Second Circuit Addresses Title VII Sexual Orientation Claims And Leaves Door Ajar For Sex Stereotyping Claims

In a three-member panel decision in Christiansen v. Omnicom Group, Inc., the Second Circuit revived a homosexual employee’s claims under Title VII on the theory of sex discrimination based on sex stereotyping, but stopped short of reconsidering prior Circuit precedent holding that Title VII does not expressly prohibit discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. … Continue Reading

New York Regulations on Wage Payment Methods Declared Invalid

As we previously reported, on September 7, 2016, the New York State Department of Labor (“NYSDOL”) published final regulations on the methods by which employees must be paid, including with respect to direct deposit of wages and payroll debit cards.  These regulations–to be codified in 12 NYCRR Part 192–were scheduled to take effect on March … Continue Reading

Proposed Regulations Issued for New York State Paid Family Leave Law

The New York Workers Compensation Board has issued a proposed rule for implementation of the statewide Paid Family Leave Law (“PFLL”), which goes into effect on January 1, 2018. As we previously reported, the PFLL will require employers to provide all eligible full- and part-time employees with paid, job-protected leave to: (i) care for a … Continue Reading

Philadelphia The Latest To Restrict Employer Inquiries Into Applicants’ Salary History

The City of Philadelphia has passed an ordinance that will make it unlawful for employers to inquire into an applicant’s wage history during the hiring process.  The law, which amends the city’s current Fair Practices Ordinance, will take effect on May 23, 2017. The ordinance states that—absent a federal, state, or local law specifically authorizing the … Continue Reading

UPDATED: EEOC Seeks Public Comment on Proposed Enforcement Guidance on Unlawful Harassment

The EEOC is seeking public comment on proposed enforcement guidance addressing unlawful workplace harassment under the federal anti-discrimination laws enforced by the agency – namely, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII), the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA).  … Continue Reading

EEOC Issues Publication on Rights of Applicants and Employees with Mental Health Conditions Under the Americans with Disabilities Act

The EEOC has issued a new publication titled “Depression, PTSD & Other Mental Health Conditions in the Workplace: Your Legal Rights” aimed at informing applicants and employees with mental health conditions of their employment rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”). The publication presents a series of questions and answers regarding applicants’ and employees’ … Continue Reading

Portland, Oregon Adopts First-of-Its-Kind CEO Pay Ratio Tax on Employers

The Portland, Oregon City Council has passed an ordinance that will impose a tax surcharge on publicly traded companies whose chief executive officers are paid at least 100 times more than the median pay of other company employees. Portland is the first locality in the nation to enact such a requirement. The law, which passed by … Continue Reading

NYC Council Introduces Suite of Worker Protection Bills, In Likely Sign of Things to Come

As we noted in an earlier post, the election of Donald J. Trump likely means that states and municipalities—and not the federal government—will lead the charge on worker-protection issues for the next four years.  In this vein, the New York City Council introduced a series of bills on December 6 aimed at tightening restrictions and … Continue Reading

Arizona and Washington Become Latest States to Require Paid Sick Leave

This Election Day, voters in Arizona and Washington approved measures requiring employers to provide eligible employees with paid sick leave. These states are the latest to join the ever-expanding patchwork of jurisdictions around the country entitling employees to paid leave for their own medical needs and those of certain family members, among other covered purposes. … Continue Reading

Second Circuit Seeks Guidance from NY Court of Appeals on Standard for Awarding Punitive Damages Under the New York City Human Rights Law

The Second Circuit is once again seeking guidance from the New York Court of Appeals, this time on the question of the appropriate standard for awarding punitive damages for unlawful discriminatory acts under the New York City Human Rights Law (“NYCHRL”).  The NYCHRL provides that punitive damages may be available where employers are found directly … Continue Reading
LexBlog