Law and the Workplace
Keisha-Ann Gray

Keisha-Ann Gray

Partner

Keisha-Ann G. Gray is a partner in the Labor & Employment Law Department and co-head of the Policies, Handbooks & Training Group. She is an experienced trial lawyer with a background in both the private and public sectors. Her practice focuses on civil law with an emphasis on employment discrimination work. Keisha-Ann counsels companies on complaint prevention and regularly litigates sexual harassment, race, age, gender and disability discrimination, retaliation, and wrongful termination claims before federal and state courts.

In addition to her legal practice, Keisha-Ann is the resident Legal Clinic Columnist for Human Resources Executive Online Magazine where she authors the magazine’s monthly management-side employment advice column and responds to reader questions. She is called upon frequently to speak and lecture on trial practice and employment discrimination defense matters.

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Connecticut Expands Anti-Discrimination and Accommodation Protections for Pregnant Employees and Applicants

Earlier this month, Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy has signed into law “An Act Concerning Pregnant Women in the Workplace” (the “Act”), which enhances employment protections for pregnant employees and applicants under the state’s existing anti-discrimination law. The expanded protections amend the Connecticut Fair Employment Practices Act (“CFEPA”) and will go into effect October 1, 2017. … Continue Reading

Update: NYC Mayor Signs Caregiver Discrimination Bill into Law

On January 5, 2016, Mayor Bill de Blasio signed into law a New York City Council bill that prohibits employment discrimination based on an individual’s actual or perceived status as a caregiver. The new law will come into effect on May 4, 2016. To fully review the coming changes, see our blog post here. Employers … Continue Reading

New York City Council Passes Caregiver Discrimination Bill

On Wednesday, December 16, 2015, the New York City Council voted 49-0 in favor of Int. No. 108-A, legislation that amends the New York City Human Rights Law (“NYCHRL”) to prohibit employment discrimination based on an individual’s actual or perceived status as a caregiver.  It is now awaiting the Mayor’s signature. Under the NYCHRL, it … Continue Reading

Judge Limits In-House Attorney Privilege in MasterCard Ruling

On August 25, 2014, Magistrate Judge Sarah Netburn of the Southern District of New York issued an order compelling MasterCard to produce several documents that the company had previously identified as privileged. The plaintiff in the ongoing contract dispute, International Cards Company, Ltd., challenged MasterCard’s privilege log, which led Judge Netburn to instruct MasterCard to … Continue Reading

Employers To Face More Concurrent EEOC and Tort Suits after Second Circuit Decision

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit has joined the Seventh and Ninth Circuits in holding that an EEOC charge will not toll the statute of limitations on a state-law tort claim. This decision likely will lead to an increase in concurrent filings of state-law tort claims and Title VII federal administrative proceedings … Continue Reading

No Longer a “Motivating Factor”: E.D.N.Y. Rules New “But-For” Causation Standard for Retaliation Retroactive

Employers who have recently suffered defeats on Title VII retaliation claims now have reason to ask for reconsideration under applicable rules.  The Eastern District of New York, in Sass v. MTA Bus Co.,   ruled that existing cases should no longer be subject to a “motivating factor” analysis, but rather, are retroactively subject to the “but-for” … Continue Reading
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