Law and the Workplace
Jenna Hayes

Jenna Hayes

Associate

Jenna Hayes is an associate in the Labor & Employment Law Department. She has assisted in all aspects of labor and employment law, including wage and hour class and collective actions, discrimination actions, and labor grievance arbitrations.

During her time at Harvard Law School, Jenna served as a member of the board of the Women’s Law Association, and as the Submissions Editor of the Harvard Journal of Sports and Entertainment Law. She also served as a certified mediator in the state of Massachusetts as part of the Harvard Mediation Program.

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Second Circuit Clarifies Pleading Standard for Title VII Claims

A Second Circuit panel recently revived a former employee’s racial discrimination suit against New York City, reversing in part the Southern District of New York’s dismissal of her case. In Littlejohn v. City of New York, No.14-1395-cv (2d Cir. August 3, 2015), the panel made a number of important holdings, including on how courts should … Continue Reading

Judge Limits In-House Attorney Privilege in MasterCard Ruling

On August 25, 2014, Magistrate Judge Sarah Netburn of the Southern District of New York issued an order compelling MasterCard to produce several documents that the company had previously identified as privileged. The plaintiff in the ongoing contract dispute, International Cards Company, Ltd., challenged MasterCard’s privilege log, which led Judge Netburn to instruct MasterCard to … Continue Reading

San Francisco “Bans the Box” for Private Employers and City Contractors

San Francisco recently became the ninth jurisdiction to enact a “ban the box” ordinance prohibiting private employers and city contractors and subcontractors from asking job applicants about their criminal histories until after the first interview. The new ordinance further restricts the types of criminal offenses about which employers and contractors may inquire or otherwise may … Continue Reading

Supreme Court’s Sandifer Decision Is Not Just About Changing Clothes

In Sandifer et al. v. United States Steel Corp., a unanimous Supreme Court clarified the meaning of “changing clothes” found in Section 203(o) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA” or “Act”), holding that “changing clothes” includes putting on (donning) and taking off (doffing) protective gear. Section 203(o) of the FLSA allows employers and unions … Continue Reading
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