Law and the Workplace
Evandro Gigante

Evandro Gigante

Partner

Evandro Gigante is a partner in the Labor & Employment Law Department and co-head of the Employment Litigation & Arbitration group and the Terminations, Reductions in Force & WARN Act group. He represents and counsels clients through a variety of labor and employment matters, including allegations of race, gender, national origin, disability and religious discrimination, sexual harassment, wrongful discharge, defamation and breach of contract. Evandro also counsels employers through reductions-in-force and advises clients on restrictive covenant issues, such as confidentiality, non-compete and non-solicit agreements.

With a focus on discrimination and harassment matters, Evandro has extensive experience representing clients before federal and state courts. He has tried cases in court and before arbitrators and routinely represents clients before administrative agencies such as the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, as well as state and local human rights commissions.

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Second Circuit Addresses Title VII Sexual Orientation Claims And Leaves Door Ajar For Sex Stereotyping Claims

In a three-member panel decision in Christiansen v. Omnicom Group, Inc., the Second Circuit revived a homosexual employee’s claims under Title VII on the theory of sex discrimination based on sex stereotyping, but stopped short of reconsidering prior Circuit precedent holding that Title VII does not expressly prohibit discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. … Continue Reading

Proposed Regulations Issued for New York State Paid Family Leave Law

The New York Workers Compensation Board has issued a proposed rule for implementation of the statewide Paid Family Leave Law (“PFLL”), which goes into effect on January 1, 2018. As we previously reported, the PFLL will require employers to provide all eligible full- and part-time employees with paid, job-protected leave to: (i) care for a … Continue Reading

Third Circuit Permits ADEA “Subgroup” Claims

The Third Circuit recently held in Karlo v. Pittsburgh Glass Works, LLC, No. 15-3435, 2017 WL 83385 (3d Cir. Jan. 10, 2017), that workers in their 50s may be recognized as a “subgroup” of employees protected by the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (“ADEA”) if employer policies inadvertently disfavor them relative to their co-workers who … Continue Reading

UPDATED: EEOC Seeks Public Comment on Proposed Enforcement Guidance on Unlawful Harassment

The EEOC is seeking public comment on proposed enforcement guidance addressing unlawful workplace harassment under the federal anti-discrimination laws enforced by the agency – namely, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII), the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA).  … Continue Reading

EEOC Issues Publication on Rights of Applicants and Employees with Mental Health Conditions Under the Americans with Disabilities Act

The EEOC has issued a new publication titled “Depression, PTSD & Other Mental Health Conditions in the Workplace: Your Legal Rights” aimed at informing applicants and employees with mental health conditions of their employment rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”). The publication presents a series of questions and answers regarding applicants’ and employees’ … Continue Reading

EEOC Issues Enforcement Guidance on National Origin Discrimination

On November 21, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) issued its Enforcement Guidance on National Origin Discrimination, which outlines the agency’s guidance on the provisions of Title VII that prohibit national origin discrimination. The Guidance offers the agency’s interpretation of how the law would apply in specific workplace situations, as well as practical tips … Continue Reading

EEOC Issues Fiscal Year 2016 Performance Report

On November 15, 2016, the EEOC published its Fiscal Year 2016 Performance and Accountability Report. The Performance Report details the EEOC’s efforts over the past fiscal year, which ran from October 1, 2015 to September 30, 2016, toward achieving “equality and justice for all” as described by Chair Jenny Yang.  In 2012, the agency adopted … Continue Reading

Arizona and Washington Become Latest States to Require Paid Sick Leave

This Election Day, voters in Arizona and Washington approved measures requiring employers to provide eligible employees with paid sick leave. These states are the latest to join the ever-expanding patchwork of jurisdictions around the country entitling employees to paid leave for their own medical needs and those of certain family members, among other covered purposes. … Continue Reading

Proposed Law Would Prohibit New York City Employers From Inquiring Into Applicants’ Wage History

New York City Public Advocate Letitia James has introduced legislation before the City Council that would amend the New York City Human Rights Law to make it an unlawful employment practice for employers to request job applicants’ wage history during the hiring process. The bill would prohibit any employer or employment agency from asking about … Continue Reading

Proposed Amendment to NYC Human Rights Law Would Prohibit Discrimination Against Uniformed Service Members and Veterans

An amendment to the New York City Human Rights Law (NYCHRL) introduced before the City Council this week would add current or prior service in the uniformed services as a protected class under the law. If approved by the Council, the bill would give veterans and active military personnel protection against discrimination in employment, as … Continue Reading

NYC Commission on Human Rights Issues Guidelines on Transgender Discrimination

On December 21, 2015, the New York City Commission on Human Rights issued new enforcement guidelines regarding discrimination on the basis of gender identity or expression. While the City Council added transgender protections to the New York City Human Rights Law (“NYCHRL”) in 2002, the Commission recently issued these detailed guidelines on what constitutes discrimination … Continue Reading

New York and California Equal Pay Laws Set to Take Effect in New Year

New equal pay laws are coming into effect in 2016 in both New York and California. The New York law, passed as part of the Women’s Equality Agenda, will come into effect on January 19, 2016, and the California law will become effective on January 1, 2016. Both new laws enact broader prohibitions on wage … Continue Reading

Governor Cuomo Signs Women’s Equality Agenda; New Law Strengthens Equal Pay Protections

On October 21, 2015, Governor Andrew Cuomo signed a group of eight laws, called the Women’s Equality Agenda, which expand protections for women in the workplace in New York. The act will become effective on January 19, 2016. The new laws give stronger protections to employees by amending existing laws to provide expanded equal pay … Continue Reading

NYCCHR Issues Guidance on Credit Check Law

The New York City Commission on Human Rights (the “Commission”) has just issued guidance in respect of the Stop Credit Discrimination in Employment Act (the “SCDEA”), which goes into effect today and modified the New York City Human Rights Law to place limitations on employers’ ability to conduct credit checks on employees and applicants for employment.  See our previous … Continue Reading

Second Circuit: FAA Mandates Stay of Claims Pending Arbitration

The Second Circuit recently held in Katz v. Cellco P’Ship d/b/a/ Verizon Wireless, Nos. 14-138, 14-291, 2015 WL 4528658 (2d Cir. July 28, 2015) that, under the Federal Arbitration Act (“FAA”), district courts must stay all proceedings upon a finding that the claims before the court are subject to arbitration if a stay is requested. … Continue Reading

Second Circuit Clarifies Pleading Standard for Title VII Claims

A Second Circuit panel recently revived a former employee’s racial discrimination suit against New York City, reversing in part the Southern District of New York’s dismissal of her case. In Littlejohn v. City of New York, No.14-1395-cv (2d Cir. August 3, 2015), the panel made a number of important holdings, including on how courts should … Continue Reading

New York City Passes Laws Enhancing Enforcement of Human Rights Law

On April 20, New York City Mayor Bill DiBlasio signed a pair of bills designed to enhance the City Human Rights Commission’s investigative and enforcement efforts in the areas of employment and housing discrimination. The first of the two new laws requires the Commission to issue annual reports on the number and types of investigations … Continue Reading

Virginia District Court Rules that EEOC Cannot Issue Early Right-to-Sue Notice

On February 24, 2015, the District Court for the Western District of Virginia dismissed a pregnancy discrimination lawsuit because the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) prematurely issued a “right-to-sue” notice, giving the plaintiff permission to file a lawsuit in court before she was allowed to do so under the law. In Taylor v. Cardiology Clinic, … Continue Reading

Anti-Discrimination and Anti-Retaliation Policies Save Employer from $3.5 Million Punitive Damages Award

On January 7, 2015, the U.S. District Court for the District of Puerto Rico issued an opinion overturning a jury’s $3.5 million punitive damages award for retaliation claims brought under Title VII and Puerto Rico law, finding that the defendant employer had demonstrated that it had made good faith efforts to implement anti-discrimination and anti-retaliation … Continue Reading

Second Circuit Allows After-Acquired Evidence to Support Termination Decision

On October 9, 2014, the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, in a summary order, affirmed a district court’s admission of evidence at trial of a former employee’s misconduct, discovered after the employee’s termination, to support the employer’s reason for discharging the employee.  Weber v. Fujifilm Medical Systems USA, Inc., et al., … Continue Reading

Judge Limits In-House Attorney Privilege in MasterCard Ruling

On August 25, 2014, Magistrate Judge Sarah Netburn of the Southern District of New York issued an order compelling MasterCard to produce several documents that the company had previously identified as privileged. The plaintiff in the ongoing contract dispute, International Cards Company, Ltd., challenged MasterCard’s privilege log, which led Judge Netburn to instruct MasterCard to … Continue Reading
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